event_available 10 december

access_time20:00

placeAIR Amsterdam

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Why are Western people wrong about how the ‘global poor’ use the internet?

Door: Prof. dr. Payal Arora - Erasmus University
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"“The next billion users”: about the online lives of millions of people in China, India, Brazil, and across the Middle East—home to most of the world’s internet users. These non-Western people constitute a bigger population and spend twice the amount of time online. What does that mean to the industry of online media and technology? How does this transform the industry? What these people are doing online is not what we ""Western"" people imagine. Why do citizens of states with strict surveillance policies appear to care so little about their digital privacy? Why do Brazilians eschew geotagging on social media? What drives young Indians to friend “foreign” strangers on Facebook and give “missed calls” to people? This lecture reveals habits of use bound to intrigue everyone from casual internet users to developers of global digital platforms to organizations seeking to reach the next billion internet users.

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How can we detect otherwise undetected victims of human trafficking?

Door: Dr. Jill Coster van Voorhout - University of Amsterdam
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Human trafficking and smuggling represent great challenges for the world we live in. It's the most painful and yet prevalent injustice of our time. Given the hidden nature of human trafficking, it is almost impossible to understand the full scope and scale of the issue. The real number of victims of human trafficking are much higher than what we know of. How can we find victims of human trafficking we otherwise could not detect?

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Do Alexa and Siri make your food choices healthier or unhealthier?

Door: Dr. Anne Klesse - Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University
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Nowadays, technological advances provide consumers with various different ways of ordering food. They may express their choice to a waiter in a restaurant in the “old fashioned way” or they may select their favourite dish by touching the screen of an Ipad or of a self—serving kiosk. When ordering food from home, they may enter their choice via mouse click on their computer or communicate with Google assistants, Alexa or Siri, instead. Does the way in which consumers express their choice matter? Could it influence what type of food they choose? In this lecture, we discuss the impact of different preference expression modalities (speaking versus motoric movements, such as button pressing) on consumer choices.

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Why do anorexia patients feel fat?

Door: Dr. Anouk Keizer - Utrecht University
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Anorexia patients have a disturbed experience of their body size. Even when they have been treated and their body weight went up to normal, their judgment of the size of their body hasn’t improved. An effective treatment for this still hasn’t been developed. And that is what Anouk is working on.

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Do action movies reinforce gender stereotypes?

Door: Dr. Dan Hassler-Forest - Utrecht University
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As a kid you project yourself to a character from your favorite movie. For instance, Star Wars or the Smurfs, but both only offer a whole variety of role models for men and not women. Over time this perspective has found a big transformation. Before, gender was portrait in popular culture as very binary. The common narrative for woman showed a fundamentally hysterical female character, being frightened or terrorized, and needed to be saved. But men were portrait as the real heroes, swinging their lightsaber. It’s crazy how the presence of a sharp pointy object gives men power over a story. Nowadays there are more movies with female characters in the lead and i.e. Disney gives them a more central role as action heroes. Representation matters! If you have female heroes (not being princesses), little girls will look up to that. It’s all about acknowledging this.